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The Harbour

The Harbour is a youth-for-youth platform focused on empowering youth to take climate action. While acting as the creative lead for the Foundation for Environmental Stewardship (FES), I was given the opportunity to brand out The Harbour from the ground up.

After discussion with the team, we decided on:

  • needing a Canadian focus within the branding
  • organic and natural, but still abstract
  • vibrant, as to emphasize the youth-focus of the platform

Below, I further break down my process in creating the brand identity for The Harbour.

(For more information about it, please visit The Harbour's website!)

 

The Harbour is a youth-for-youth platform focused on empowering youth to take climate action. While acting as the creative lead for the Foundation for Environmental Stewardship (FES), I was given the opportunity to brand out The Harbour from the ground up.


After discussion with the team, we decided on:

  • needing a Canadian focus within the branding
  • organic and natural, but still abstract
  • vibrant, as to emphasize the youth-focus of the platform

Below, I further break down my process in creating the brand identity for The Harbour.

(For more information about it, please visit The Harbour's website!)

 


 

The Harbour is a youth-for-youth platform focused on empowering youth to take climate action. While acting as the creative lead for the Foundation for Environmental Stewardship (FES), I was given the opportunity to brand out The Harbour from the ground up.

After discussion with the team, we decided on:

  • needing a Canadian focus within the branding
    organic and natural, but still abstract
    vibrant, as to emphasize the youth-focus of the platform

Below, I further break down my process in creating the brand identity for The Harbour.

(For more information about it, please visit The Harbour's website!)


 

The Harbour is a youth-for-youth platform focused on empowering youth to take climate action. While acting as the creative lead for the Foundation for Environmental Stewardship (FES), I was given the opportunity to brand out The Harbour from the ground up.

After discussion with the team, we decided on:

  • needing a Canadian focus within the branding
  • organic and natural, but still abstract
  • vibrant, as to emphasize the youth-focus of the platform

Below, I further break down my process in creating the brand identity for The Harbour.

(For more information about it, please visit The Harbour's website!)

The Harbour is a youth-for-youth platform focused on empowering youth to take climate action. While acting as the creative lead for the Foundation for Environmental Stewardship (FES), I was given the opportunity to brand out The Harbour from the ground up.

After discussion with the team, we decided on:

needing a Canadian focus within the branding
organic and natural, but still abstract
vibrant, as to emphasize the youth-focus of the platform
Below, I further break down my process in creating the brand identity for The Harbour.

(For more information about it, please visit The Harbour's website!)

THE BRANDING PROCESS

Inspiration

Collectively, we pulled a lot of inspiration from the works of the Group of Seven, and fellow artists Tom Thomson and Emily Carr. As celebrated Canadian painters, their works are easily recognizeable, vibrant, and use abstracted images to create a feeling of nature that we thought was fitting for the Harbour's identity.

 

Collectively, we pulled a lot of inspiration from the works of the Group of Seven, and fellow artists Tom Thomson and Emily Carr. As celebrated Canadian painters, their works are easily recognizeable, vibrant, and use abstracted images to create a feeling of nature that we thought was fitting for the Harbour's identity.

 

Collectively, we pulled a lot of inspiration from the works of the Group of Seven, and fellow artists Tom Thomson and Emily Carr. As celebrated Canadian painters, their works are easily recognizeable, vibrant, and use abstracted images to create a feeling of nature that we thought was fitting for the Harbour's identity.

 

Collectively, we pulled a lot of inspiration from the works of the Group of Seven, and fellow artists Tom Thomson and Emily Carr. As celebrated Canadian painters, their works are easily recognizeable, vibrant, and use abstracted images to create a feeling of nature that we thought was fitting for the Harbour's identity.

Collectively, we pulled a lot of inspiration from the works of the Group of Seven, and fellow artists Tom Thomson and Emily Carr. As celebrated Canadian painters, their works are easily recognizeable, vibrant, and use abstracted images to create a feeling of nature that we thought was fitting for the Harbour's identity.

The Harbour - Inspiration: a collage of paintings by The Group of Seven, Tom Thomson, and Emily Carr. Text on the image reads

Early Iterations

Harbour Roughs, early iterations in black and white. The logo sketches vary from leaf-motifs to cliffs emulating the look and feel of the Group of Seven.
Harbour Roughs, early iterations in black and white. The logo sketches are contained within shapes, either squares or circles. All contain various abstract designs, pulled from nature.
Harbour Roughs, early iterations in black and white. The logo sketches are contained within shapes, either squares or rectangles. These versions are extremely abstract, playing with contrast and negative/positive space.

I began this process with the above sketches. After talking with the Director, we agreed we wanted something inside a shape, more in-line with a stamp. I began sketching using a mixture of natural and abstract shapes. The third sketches were what I ended up exploring further, after narrowing the others down.

 

I began this process with the above sketches. After talking with the Director, we agreed we wanted something inside a shape, more in-line with a stamp. I began sketching using a mixture of natural and abstract shapes. The third sketches were what I ended up exploring further, after narrowing the others down.

I began this process with the above sketches. After talking with the Director, we agreed we wanted something inside a shape, more in-line with a stamp. I began sketching using a mixture of natural and abstract shapes. The third sketches were what I ended up exploring further, after narrowing the others down.

 

I began this process with the above sketches. After talking with the Director, we agreed we wanted something inside a shape, more in-line with a stamp. I began sketching using a mixture of natural and abstract shapes. The third sketches were what I ended up exploring further, after narrowing the others down.

I began this process with the above sketches. After talking with the Director, we agreed we wanted something inside a shape, more in-line with a stamp. I began sketching using a mixture of natural and abstract shapes. The third sketches were what I ended up exploring further, after narrowing the others down.

Refinements

The Harbour Early Iterations: various colours, shapes, and versions of the eventual harbour logo. It is meant to represent waves upon a shore, alongwith a sun.

I began this process with the above sketches. The logo began as abstracted shapes in a rectangular box to
signify a “stamp” motif. As colour, organic shape, and negative space were explored, the logo became less angular and more vibrant. The subtle curvature of the shapes invoke the organic, abstracted brushstrokes of the Group of Seven while remaining clean, simplified, and distinctly modern.

 

I began this process with the above sketches. The logo began as abstracted shapes in a rectangular box to signify a “stamp” motif. As colour, organic shape, and negative space were explored, the logo became less angular and more vibrant. The subtle curvature of the shapes invoke the organic, abstracted brushstrokes of the Group of Seven while remaining clean, simplified, and distinctly modern.

 

I began this process with the above sketches. The logo began as abstracted shapes in a rectangular box to signify a “stamp” motif. As colour, organic shape, and negative space were explored, the logo became less angular and more vibrant. The subtle curvature of the shapes invoke the organic, abstracted brushstrokes of the Group of Seven while remaining clean, simplified, and distinctly modern.

 

I began this process with the above sketches. The logo began as abstracted shapes in a rectangular box to signify a “stamp” motif. As colour, organic shape, and negative space were explored, the logo became less angular and more vibrant. The subtle curvature of the shapes invoke the organic, abstracted brushstrokes of the Group of Seven while remaining clean, simplified, and distinctly modern.

I began this process with the above sketches. The logo began as abstracted shapes in a rectangular box to signify a “stamp” motif. As colour, organic shape, and negative space were explored, the logo became less angular and more vibrant. The subtle curvature of the shapes invoke the organic, abstracted brushstrokes of the Group of Seven while remaining clean, simplified, and distinctly modern.

Logo Variations

Blackandwhite
BlackWhiteAccent
Colour_487ab347-1c1b-4f5a-934a-3c44300994e0

An important part  of the branding process is ensuring that the logos work in many settings, which is why I build my logos in black and white while experimenting with colour. These two versions, above, are the B&W and BW Accent versions of the Harbour logo. They also work easily inverted, white on black (or cream, like this webpage!)

 

The final logo was chosen for its youthful appearance, its bright colour palette, and its simplicity to be recognizeable at a small size as a "stamp of approval" for supported initiatives in the climate space. Though initially rectangular, the final logo was created in a square format for ease-of-use cross-platform.

 

An important part  of the branding process is ensuring that the logos work in many settings, which is why I build my logos in black and white while experimenting with colour. These two versions, above, are the B&W and BW Accent versions of the Harbour logo. They also work easily inverted, white on black (or cream, like this webpage!)

The final logo was chosen for its youthful appearance, its bright colour palette, and its simplicity to be recognizeable at a small size as a "stamp of approval" for supported initiatives in the climate space. Though initially rectangular, the final logo was created in a square format for ease-of-use cross-platform.

 

An important part  of the branding process is ensuring that the logos work in many settings, which is why I build my logos in black and white while experimenting with colour. These two versions, above, are the B&W and BW Accent versions of the Harbour logo. They also work easily inverted, white on black (or cream, like this webpage!)

The final logo was chosen for its youthful appearance, its bright colour palette, and its simplicity to be recognizeable at a small size as a "stamp of approval" for supported initiatives in the climate space. Though initially rectangular, the final logo was created in a square format for ease-of-use cross-platform.

An important part  of the branding process is ensuring that the logos work in many settings, which is why I build my logos in black and white while experimenting with colour. These two versions, above, are the B&W and BW Accent versions of the Harbour logo. They also work easily inverted, white on black (or cream, like this webpage!)

The final logo was chosen for its youthful appearance, its bright colour palette, and its simplicity to be recognizeable at a small size as a "stamp of approval" for supported initiatives in the climate space. Though initially rectangular, the final logo was created in a square format for ease-of-use cross-platform.

An important part  of the branding process is ensuring that the logos work in many settings, which is why I build my logos in black and white while experimenting with colour. These two versions, above, are the B&W and BW Accent versions of the Harbour logo. They also work easily inverted, white on black (or cream, like this webpage!)

Colour Palette

The colour palette was taken from natural elements, and from the paintings that inspired us. Bright, youthful, but still natural (the colours of blooming flowers, growth and sunny days), this palette was chosen with care to represent The Harbour as best as it could.

 

colour-palette-squares-02
Harbour Blue
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Harbour Red
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Harbour Lime
colour-palette-squares-06
Lavender (Secondary Palette)
colour-palette-squares-05
Sage Green (Secondary Palette)
colour-palette-squares-07
Yellow (Secondary Palette)
Colour_487ab347-1c1b-4f5a-934a-3c44300994e0

Typography

The final piece of the puzzle for The Harbour's branding was its typography, for both the logo and for use on the website and publications. Because of the complexity and soft shapes of the square logo, I complemented it with a simple, modern and elegant sans serif, Spartan. Because of Spartan's diversity of weights, it can be used as the main copy font as well.

 

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© isabel k. hughes design, 2023

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